Takeout creates a lot of trash. It doesn’t have to.

Our single-use items aren’t helping the fight against climate change but there are easy hacks to reduce and reuse. Climate Lab is produced by the University of California in partnership with Vox. Hosted by conservation scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan, the videos explore the surprising elements of our lives that contribute to climate change and the groundbreaking work being done to fight back. Featuring conversations with experts, scientists, thought leaders and activists, the series demystifies topics like nuclear power, food waste and online shopping to make them more approachable and actionable for those who want to do their part. Sanjayan is an alum of UC Santa Cruz, a Visiting Researcher at UCLA and the CEO of Conservation International.

More info

Advertisements

How Technicholor changed movies

In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the history of Technicolor: both the technology and the company. Many people recognize Technicolor from The Wizard of Oz, but the technology existed long before then. Two strip Technicolor and three strip Technicolor both revolutionized the film industry and shaped the look of 20th century film.

But Technicolor also influenced movies through its corporate control of the technology. People like Natalie Kalmus shaped the aesthetic of color films, and directors redesigned their sets and films based on the Technicolor look that the company — and viewers — demanded.

Though the process we traditionally recognize as Technicolor is no longer in use (the company does continue), the look remains influential even today.

More here

El mundo en 2050 —Laura Soucek

Laura Soucek, investigadora del Vall d’Hebron Instituto de Oncología, habla sobre los principales retos científicos en su campo que afrontará la humanidad en los próximos 30 años.

I Love Mexico — Lance Wyman México Te Quiero Pin

mexico_pin_mockup_detail_pink_1024x1024

Lance Wyman has designed a pin to help raise money for Mexico. *All Proceeds (excluding delivery) will be donated to Mexico Earthquake Relief via Oxfam.

Mexico 68 —Lance Wyman on the ’68 Olympic Design

mexico-68-wall-art

(AUDIO)

The 1968 Olympics took place in Mexico City, Mexico. It was the first games ever hosted in a Latin American country. And for Mexico City, the event was an opportunity to show the world that they were a metropolis as worthy as London, Berlin, Rome or Tokyo to host this huge international affair.

Among other ground-breaking aspects of the Mexico 68 games, the graphic design campaign (including the logo, posters and other graphics) would become one of the most famous in Olympic history. It would go on to set a whole new standard for future Games.

And these government-commissioned designs would also be co-opted by local activists, who wanted to reveal the darker political reality in Mexico — a reality that they felt was being covered up behind the beautiful glossy imagery of the 1968 Games.

 

Listen 99% Invisible Mexico 68

Full article here

Un Mexicano detrás del Proyecto The Next Rembrandt

thenext

Emmanuel Flores Elías es director de Tecnología e Innovación en la agencia de publicidad J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam. Gran parte de su carrera se ha desarrollado en la intersección entre diseño y tecnología, en un intento de comprender y aproximar ambos mundos.

Muy amablemente Emmanuel nos brindó a los Kowalski, un programa de radio en español que se transmite desde Polonia vía Radiownet y Mixcloud, una muy interesante conversación sobre la aplicación de la tecnología en la comunicación, mercadotecnia y desarrollo de productos.

Emmanuel es originario de la Ciudad de México, realizó estudios de Diseño de Interactividad en la Real Academia de las Artes en la Haya, Holanda. Emmanuel ha sido el responsable de liderar The Next Rembrandt, un multi-premiado proyecto en el que se hizo una recopilación de datos sobre los lienzos del artista flamenco  para recrear una obra original emulando el estilo del pintor.

En esta entrevista, Emmanuel nos habla de su experiencia en el desarrollo de The Next Rembrandt, de otros proyectos que ha realizado en Japón y China, así como de su visión del futuro inmediato de la revolución tecnológica que vivimos actualmente.

El proyecto de Next Rembrandt fue desarrollado por J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam para el ING Bank (haz click aquí).  Para escuchar la entrevista completa de Emmanuel Flores en “los Kowalski”, haz click aquí.

Un mexicano detrás del proyecto The Next Rembrandt

Emmanuel Flores Elías es director de Tecnología e Innovación en la agencia de publicidad J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam. Gran parte de su carrera se ha desarrollado en la intersección entre diseño y tecnología, en un intento de comprender y aproximar ambos mundos.

Muy amablemente Emmanuel nos brindó a los Kowalski, un programa de radio en español que se transmite desde Polonia vía Radiownet y Mixcloud, una muy interesante conversación sobre la aplicación de la tecnología en la comunicación, mercadotecnia y desarrollo de productos.

Emmanuel es originario de la Ciudad de México, realizó estudios de Diseño de Interactividad en la Real Academia de las Artes en la Haya, Holanda. Emmanuel ha sido el responsable de liderar The Next Rembrandt, un multi-premiado proyecto en el que se hizo una recopilación de datos sobre los lienzos del artista flamenco  para recrear una obra original emulando el estilo del pintor.

View original post 97 more words

Books to Design Your Life

books

Two books that use design principles to build a life you would love to live.

Bill Burnett and Dave Evans introduced the Designing for Life course to Standford University in the US 15 years ago. Those that enrolled were younger students, mid-career professionals and retirees, who were all taught to “think like a designer.”

The basic idea is to encourage people to design a career and a life that is “meaningful, joyful and fulfilling” to help them reduce anxieties and reach clear goals.

The course has now been translated into The Designing your Life book. Read Review

Design Your Life by Vince Frost – the globally recognised designer and head honcho at The Frost* Collective – is no ordinary design book, with minimal pictures and maximum words, it acts more as an inspirational guide on how to apply design principals to your life, with motivational anecdotes and uplifting quotes. Read Review

Designing your Life by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans

Design your Life by Vince Frost

 

How much is your data worth to Facebook?

may-14-rtr4c0uz-e14632455051061

PERSONAL DATA VALUATION TOOL FOR FACEBOOK USERS

Researchers from the Carlos III University in Madrid, Spain, have created the FDTV. The goal of this project is to develop a tool that informs in real-time Internet end users regarding the economic value that the personal information associated to their browsing activity has generated. Due to the complexity of the problem the researchers have narrow down the scope of this tool to FB in this project, i.e., inform FB users in real time of the value that they are generating to FB.  They are expected to implement in all browsers and the rest of social media applications.

FDVT

More info (Spanish) here

The pink Mexican wall in all its gorgeous perversity

1440

Mexican firm Estudio 3.14 has visualised the “gorgeous perversity” of US president-elect Donald Trump‘s plan to build a wall along the countries’ border.

In response to the controversial proposal, a group of interns at the Guadalajara-based studio came up with a conceptual design that would celebrate Mexico’s architectural heritage.

Moreover, the wall is not only a wall,” said Estudio 3.14. “It is a prison where 11 million undocumented people will be processed, classified, indoctrinated, and/or deported.”

The team suggests that the wall could employ up to six million personnel. It could also incorporate shopping centre straddling its width, and a viewpoint from which US citizens could climb up and look down onto the other side.

Behold Donald Trump’s pink Mexican border wall, designed by Estudio 3.14