Voices of Indigenous Women by Sara Curruchich

Being a woman in Guatemala is an act of resistance. Being a Mayan Kaqchikel woman and an artist is, in itself, a political statement, but also a radical gesture towards life and would be the best way to introduce Sara Curruchich.

Sara Curruchich was born in 1993 in San Juan Comalapa, Chimaltenango, in a Kaqchikel community in the central Guatemalan highlands. Her people have a long tradition of art and knowledge, but also with a great force of resistance and struggle. From that account, his musical proposal is based on the collective and individual feelings of the peoples, history, memory, culture, languages and struggles combined with personal demand.

One of the latest initiatives on the Internet was promoted by the Guatemalan kaqchikel singer-songwriter Sara Curruchich, who has published a playlist called Voces de Mujeres Indígenas on Spotify, with songs from around the world from Argentina, Australia, Sweden or Cameroon, among other countries. “Chupam ri qach’ab’äl k’äs ri qana’oj chuqa ri qab’anob’äl.” (Our thinking and our way of interpreting life and the world lives in our language), sentence in Kaqchikel Miguel Angel Oxlaj.

The voices and music of indigenous women around the world bring together the heartbeats of the peoples, the fire of the ancestors, the joys and strength of the rivers. We don’t stop, we don’t shut up.

saracurruchich.com/

“Gris” a game about grief in a world devoid of color

GRIS opens in a world devoid of color. As a nameless, silent young woman, you traverse the desolate landscape, filled with crumbling ruins and a bleak sky, with an almost balletic sense of movement. You float and glide through the world. Slowly you’re able to bring color and light back, and as the world morphs, so does the main character. Gris starts out simple and stark, but ends as one of the most beautiful games ever made.

GRIS is a hopeful young girl lost in her own world, dealing with a painful experience in her life. Her journey through sorrow is manifested in her dress, which grants new abilities to better navigate her faded reality. As the story unfolds, Gris will grow emotionally and see her world in a different way, revealing new paths to explore using her new abilities.

GRIS is a serene and evocative experience, free of danger, frustration or death. Players will explore a meticulously designed world brought to life with delicate art, detailed animation, and an elegant original score. Through the game light puzzles, platforming sequences, and optional skill-based challenges will reveal themselves as more of Gris’s world becomes accessible.

GRIS is an experience with almost no text, only simple control reminders illustrated through universal icons. The game can be enjoyed by anyone regardless of their spoken language.

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“Gris” the game

 

Milton Glaser, Master Designer of ‘I ♥ NY’ Logo, Is Dead at 91

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He was also a founder of New York magazine, created a memorable Bob Dylan poster and produced designs for everything from supermarkets to restaurants to “Mad Men.”

Full article New York Times

Saul Bass Turns 100

Saul Bass Turns 100 – Criterion Channel Trailer from Criterion Collection on Vimeo.
There were title sequences before Saul Bass, and there were title sequences after Saul Bass. The legendary graphic artist, born 100 years ago on May 8, revolutionized the art of motion-picture credits with his groundbreaking opening to Otto Preminger’s THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM, using strikingly minimalist design elements to visualize the story’s explosive theme of drug addiction. Over the next forty years, Bass would employ techniques ranging from animation (AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS, OCEAN’S 11) to live action (WALK ON THE WILD SIDE) to avant-garde experimentation (SECONDS) to time-lapse photography (THE AGE OF INNOCENCE) to create some of the most dazzling title sequences of all time, miniature works of art that not only set the mood for the feature to follow but which often help to tell the story itself. Though he directed only one feature—the visually stunning science-fiction head trip PHASE IV—Bass left behind a widely influential legacy as one of the most innovative film artists of the twentieth century.

Their Dark Materials

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Vantablack is a pigment that reaches a level of darkness that’s so intense, it’s kind of upsetting. It’s so black it’s like looking at a hole cut out of the universe. “Vantablack is striking when you look at it… because it [doesn’t look] like something is colored black. It looks like an absence. It disappears,” explains Adam Rogers, a journalist who writes for Wired. Vantablack swallows nearly all visible light and gives back no reflection, so every contour or crease of whatever it’s applied to disappears. It has this odd effect of making something look two dimensional, while at the same time as if you can fall right through it.

99 Invisible Podcast

 

Hellvetica: The Type purgatory

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Creative Directors Zack Roif and Matthew Woodward have released a deliberately bad version of the helvetica typeface family. called ‘hellvetica’, the updated design features questionable kerning properties specifically created to irritate graphic designers on the occasion of halloween.

Full article design Boom

Hellvetica

The Elements

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Why the Periodic Table of Elements Is More Important Than Ever

Mendeleev’s 150-year-old periodic table has become the menu for a world hungry for material benefits. Here a text by Peter Coy in the Bloomberg Newsweek and a very nice digital information design.

The Elements

Explore Charlie Chaplin’s life and career via a new digital archive

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A wealth of rare materials including photos, letters and script notes have been made available for the first time. Charles Chaplin’s very own and painstakingly preserved professional and personal archives: photographsscreenplaysletters and much more.

Full story in Little White Lies

Visit the Charles Chaplin’s archive here

Bauhaus architecture and design from A to Z

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To conclude our the Bauhaus 100 series, celebrating the centenary of the hugely influential design school, Dezeen round out everything you need to know about the Bauhaus, from A to Z.

Dezeen Link

A 200-year-old guide to color, redesigned for the internet age

Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours

Centuries after naturalists used it to define the colors they saw in the natural world, Abraham Gottlob Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours is back.

The nomenclature of colors we use today is really a machine language–numerical hex codes crafted to communicate with software on computers and printers. Before the age of CMYK and RBG, though, artists and scientists created their own languages for talking about and categorizing color. Though many have fallen into obscurity, at least one is now accessible to anyone with access to the internet: Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours.

Full Text in Fast Company